Friday, October 12, 2018

Book Bites: Charles Dodd White, author of In the House of Wilderness

I'm so excited today to bring you an interview with Charles Dodd White, in my opinion one of the best Appalachian writers to date, whose harrowing In the House of Wilderness debuted last month to critical acclaim. White is known for the beauty and brilliance of his language and now he's bringing us a story of mythical proportions, set in a stark and desperate landscape, centered on a family that embodies the harshness of the land around them.

https://www.indiebound.org/book/9780804012102

"In the House of Wilderness may be Charles Dodd White’s finest achievement to date. This is a story that at once moves and lingers, well paced but dripping with the language we've come to expect from his pen. Line for line, White is one of the most talented writers at work in the American South."—David Joy
 
 
 

What drew you to the genre you write in?

I can’t become invested in a piece of writing unless I can feel that something urgent is at stake. So, for me, that really dismisses a lot of so called “high concept” fiction. Some readers have called my writing Gothic, but I really think I’m writing realistically about people who find themselves in difficult circumstances. I want the reader to feel like the conflicts my characters face are recognizable and important. That’s the heart of fiction, for me.


Have you ever given up on a writing project?

More than once. When you sit down to write a novel, you’re flying blind. One of the great things about that is that you have a world of possibility in front of you, and if you’re doing the job right you’re taking big risks. The downside of that is, of course, those risks don’t always pay off and sometimes you end up with a mess on your hands. I like what Harry Crews said about this, though I’ll butcher it in paraphrase. Sometimes, when the work isn’t there, it needs to go into the fire. I like that idea of purifying the work by destroying it so then you can go on and make something new from the ground up.


What piece of your own writing are you most proud of?

I’m always proudest of what I’m currently working on. I want to make sure I’m doing something different each time I set out on a project. As a writer it’s important to keep looking forward and to realize you’re building something longitudinal. A long term career is something that requires you to try to understand yourself and to reflect that honestly in what you create.

In your eyes, what does it mean to be a “successful” writer?

Success is writing the books that only you are meant to write. That might translate into sales, big publishers, and critical accolades or it might not. But being proud of sticking to your own view of what your art should be isn’t something that can be taken away from you. 


Who was your intended audience for the novel?

In the House of Wilderness is a book for people who believe the world doesn’t offer up easy answers. The characters are human, and as such, they are flawed. I’m not interested in writing something that promotes a cardboard version of right and wrong. As Hawthorne said: “Ambiguity is sacred.”


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